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Ugandan Healthcare

Posted on by Brendan Borrell

The scent of urine permeates the pediatric ward at the overcrowded Mbarara regional hospital. Although healthcare here is supposed to be free, this sign is evidence that underpaid government doctors (and imposters from outside) have been known to ask for a few thousand shillings -- in the waiting room or on the operating table.

Met this amazing spiritualist in a remote village on the DRC border, 3 hours south of Arua. Many years ago, he fell into madness for 3 months, wandering around with a knife, but he discovered that when he took ahold of people he could divine their ailments. He's now working with health authorities to diagnose plague cases.

This schoolteacher has spent 2 weeks at a traditional healer's hut outside Arua. His leg reeked of rot, and he had to cover it with a cloth to keep the flies off. "This gentleman has done a tremendous job," he said of the healer. Amputation is likely.

This schoolteacher has spent 2 weeks at a traditional healer's hut outside Arua. His leg reeked of rot, and he had to cover it with a cloth to keep the flies off. "This gentleman has done a tremendous job," he said of the healer. Amputation is likely.

When an Ebola outbreak strikes, the first victims are often the most dedicated health workers on the front lines.

Nahayo, a well-known tooth extractor near Mbarara, examines an infant for signs of "false teeth," an imaginary disease that is said to be deadly. In fact, it is the treatment -- removal of tooth buds -- that often leads to serious complications or the delay of treatment for real illnesses.

After cleaning off the dried blood. Nahayo's son shows me the flattened bicycle spoke used for tooth extractions.

At a Dutch-owned flower farm in Entebbe, workers drink artemesinin tea to prevent malaria. The practice, which is growing more widespread, is recommended against by the WHO and most experts for fear that it could spread resistance to drugs derived from the antimalarial plant.

At a Dutch-owned flower farm in Entebbe, workers drink artemesinin tea to prevent malaria. The practice, which is growing more widespread, is recommended against by the WHO and most experts for fear that it could spread resistance to drugs derived from the antimalarial plant.